1939

At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. The download here is only for the first hour of the mix. For the full 4.5-hour version please come to centuriesofsound.com to stream, or patreon.com/centuriesofsound for downloads and a host of other bonus materials for just $5 per month. This show would not be possible without my supporters on there, so please consider signing up or sharing this with someone who may be interested.

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A decade ago, researching another project, I found myself listening to oral histories of the second world war, interviews with people who were children during The Blitz. Their memories, surprisingly, included admissions that they had found the experience to be an exciting one, playing in a semi-ruined, semi-abandoned city. This was the inspiration for a novel (which I think will never be ready for release, no great loss there) – but is it useful as a picture to paint of the time? It challenges a popular perspective, but does it just do this by introducing another, equally unbalanced one?

British culture is awash with unreal memory of the second world war. Popular entertainment of the time has already been forgotten – for those who were born in the decades to follow, the stiffness, forced jollity and now-obscure references make it hard to connect with Arthur Askey or Tommy Handley – but the “blitz spirit,” the never-issued “keep calm and carry on” poster and a whole industry of Hitler-based comedy remain cultural touchstones. It’s in this spirit that nostalgic collages of the time are assembled – plucky Londoners going about their business cut to the post-war orchestral recording of Vera Lynn singing “We’ll Meet Again” This recording seems to hold much less in the way of restless ghosts than the contemporary version with Vera backed by Arthur Young on the Novachord (one of the world’s first synthesisers) – but the goal of nostalgia is always to comfort.

Perhaps the best way to address this time is by starting in the manner of the documentary series The World At War (still close to definitive nearly 50 years after its release) which opens with a deadpan monotone describing the arbitrary massacre and destruction of an entire village. It’s an act of genuine courage to present some of the worst horrors immediately, challenging the viewers to only keep watching if they are ready for more of this – no glory or heroism, no warm glow, just unspeakable horror, and only an ambiguous way for the horror to be eventually stopped.

I am – thankfully! – not making a documentary about the second world war, but, all the same, the idea of a sound collage of 1939 leaving it out entirely is a ridiculous one. If I layer pop songs of the time behind news clips, then all I am doing is dulling them of all meaning, folding them into this insulting nostalgic view. Equally, if I put stirring, positive music behind political speeches, is that not a tacit endorsement for their place in history? Is it my place to present Churchill, for example, as a hero? And yet I cannot steer clear of manipulation entirely. For the most part I have tried to give news reports and speeches space to breathe, using classical recordings which are less time-bound than pop or jazz, but when I needed to adopt a palette, the flavours were sadness and hope.

But I’m afraid I’ve been leading you down the garden path a little here. This is a four and a half hour long mix (!) and the second world war doesn’t really make an appearance until the last hour. While Europe and East Asia spent the year either at war or in anticipation of war, for the rest of the world, other things were on the agenda. This is the year that swing starts to really split – the smoother styles, more acceptable by white society, were becoming codified in the “Big Bands” of Glenn Miller, Harry James and Tommy Dorsey. Band leaders like Louis Jordan and instrumentalists like Pete Johnson were taking inspiration from blues to create an upbeat kind of stripped-down jazz, which would soon be labelled “rhythm & blues”, “jump blues” and eventually “rock & roll”. Then there were the swing pioneers, looking to break down ideas about rhythm and melody, big names like Lionel Hampton and Duke Ellington who were kicking off what would soon become “Bebop”. It’s a genuinely exciting time for music, and three and a half hours seemed, if anything, not enough to give a real feel of all these ideas in the air.

Of all the recordings featured here, however, the two most notable fit neither into the war, nor the developments in swing. Solomon Linda & The Evening Birds improvised “Mbube” in the only recording studio in Sub-Saharan Africa one day in 1939 – while the song is best-known these days for its adaptation “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”, this belies its importance for generations of African musicians. Then there is Billie Holiday’s recording of “Strange Fruit” – the only pre-50s recording in Rolling Stone’s new top 500 tracks of all time. It’s more than I can do to write about it, and even mixing it seemed crude and insulting, instead it sits on its own at the heart of this mix.

Tracklist

0:00:00 Victor Young – Prelude
(Clip from BBC Winston Churchill – Ten Weeks Of War)
(Clip from The Voder – Homer Dudley Bell Labs)
0:00:38 Harry James – Here Comes The Night
(Clip from 1939-09-03 BBC Places Of Entertainment To Be Closed)
0:01:32 Solomon Linda & The Evening Birds – Mbube
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
0:04:33 Betty Hutton – Ol’ Man Mose
(Clip from Gone With The Wind)
0:07:16 Glenn Miller – In The Mood
0:10:49 Al Donahue – In The Mood (Paula Kelly, Vocal)
(Clip from Ninotchka)
0:11:31 Carmen Miranda – Mama Eu Quero
0:13:27 Fats Waller – Ain’t Misbehavin’
(Clip from The Women)
0:17:24 Art Tatum – Tea For Two
(Clip from Gone With The Wind)
0:19:54 Lionel Hampton – Central Avenue Breakdown
(Clip from Young Mr Lincoln)
0:23:01 Pete Johnson – Let ’em Jump
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
0:26:31 Billie Holiday – Some Other Spring
(Clip from 1939-03-08 BBC Gas Mask Drill)
(Clip from A.R.P. – Gas All Clear (Handbells))
0:29:40 Willie ‘The Lion’ Smith – Echoes Of Spring
(Clip from 1939-03-15 BBC Chamberlain After Czech Invasion)


0:32:07 Duke Ellington – Sergeant Was Shy
(Clip from Only Angels Have Wings)
0:34:47 Xavier Cugat – One Two Three Kick Conga
(Clip from Ninotchka)
0:36:24 The Manhattan Brothers – Thaba Tseu
(Clip from Gone With The Wind)
0:39:12 Raymond Scott – Oil Gusher
(Clip from Bachelor Mother)
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
(Clip from The Cup Final 1939)
0:41:24 Benny Goodman Sextet – Flyin’ Home
0:44:35 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Ida Red
0:46:52 The Carter Family – Hello Stranger
(Clip from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes)
0:48:59 Grigoraș Dinicu – Hora Lui Ion Dinicu Și Sârbă Lui Tanţi
(Clip from General Franco in Barcelona)
0:50:09 Sexteto Flores – Un Besito No Mas
(Clip from Hollywood Hobbies)
0:53:31 Artie Shaw – Begin The Beguine
(Clip from Philo T Farnsworth – The Birth of Television)
0:55:27 Carl Stalling – Good Egg
(Clip from Beau Geste)
0:55:53 Hoosier Hot Shots – Like A Monkey Likes Cocoanuts
(Clip from Dodge City)
0:57:50 Cats And The Fiddle – I Miss You So
(Clip from La Règle du Jeu)


1:00:22 Charles Trenet – Mam’zelle Clioénilmontant
(Clip from Le Jour se lève)
1:03:51 Georgius – Sur La Route De Pen-Zac
(Clip from La Règle du Jeu)
1:05:31 Django Reinhardt Et Le Quintette Du Hot Club De France, Avec Stéphane Grappelli – Younger Generation
(Clip from The Voder – Homer Dudley Bell Labs)
1:07:59 Gus Viseur – Swing 39
(Clip from Lou Gehrig – Farewell To Baseball)
1:10:43 John Kirby – Effervescent Blues
1:12:29 Andy Kirk – Twinklin’
(Clip of Dr James Naismith – Creator Of Basketball In Rare Interview)
(Clip from Eve Ad 2000)
(Clip from Blondie Dagwood – Dagwoods New Suit)
1:15:60 Count Basie Orchestra – You Can Depend On Me
(Clip from Blondie Dagwood – Dagwoods New Suit)
1:19:14 Bud Freeman – The Eel
1:20:39 Lead Belly – Poor Howard / Green Corn
(Clip from Drums Along the Mohawk)
(Clip from Goodbye Mr Chips)
1:23:45 Ari Barroso, Lamartine Babo – No Rancho Fundo
(Clip from Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney – 1939 newsreel footage)
1:25:47 King Radio – It’s The Rhythm We Want
(Clip from Midnight)
1:28:28 Ink Spots – If I Didn’t Care
(Clip from Confessions of a Nazi Spy)


1:32:08 Lagos Mozart Orchestra – Esan Inyong Ikide
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
1:34:07 Flanagan & Allen – Nice People
(Clip of WC Fields in You Can’t Cheat An Honest Man)
1:35:56 杉井幸一 – おけさ節
(Clip from Son of Frankenstein Trailer)
1:37:23 Carl Stalling – Rubber Dog
1:37:39 Judy Garland – The Jitterbug
(Clip from Blondie Dagwood – Dagwood’s New Suit)
1:39:03 Raymond Scott – Bumpy Weather Over Newark
(Clip from Bachelor Mother)
(Clip from The Voder – Homer Dudley Bell Labs)
(Clip from Breakfast Pals)
1:40:07 Ramblers – Drie Kleine Vischjes (Vocal – Wim Poppink)
1:41:02 Kay Kyser – Three Little Fishies
(Clip from Hollywood Hobbies)
1:42:42 Louis Armstrong – Jeepers Creepers
(Clip of James Hilton discussing his Goodbye Mr Chips – CBS Radio Interview)
1:44:45 Patricia Rossborough – Sunrise Serenade
1:46:09 Thaton Ba Hein – Taw Hnit Taung Swe
(Clip from Intermezzo)
1:48:08 Sukru Tunar – Cifte Telli
(Clip from Ninotchka)
1:51:08 Joe Turner & Pete Johnson – Roll ’em Pete
1:52:55 Sonny Boy Williamson – Good Gravy
(Clip from Midnight)
1:54:31 Louis Jordan And His Tympany Five – Keep A-Knockin’ (But You Can’t Come In)
(Clip from Gone With The Wind)
1:56:20 Lionel Hampton And His Orchestra – Denison Swing
(Clip from Stagecoach)
1:59:36 Gene Autry – Back In The Saddle Again
(Clip from Drums Along the Mohawk)


2:01:42 Ida Cox – Death Letter Blues
(Clip of Lincoln’s cross examination from Young Mr Lincoln)
2:03:21 Jelly Roll Morton – Oh Didn’t He Ramble (+ Sidney Bechet)
2:06:10 Sister Rosetta Tharpe – This Train
(Clip from In Name Only)
2:08:45 Mills Brothers – Georgia On My Mind
(Clip from Destry Rides Again)
2:11:38 Sidney Bechet Quintet – Summertime
2:15:26 Billie Holiday – Strange Fruit
2:18:47 Perihan Altindag And Rakim Elkutlu – Ne Bahar Kaldi Ne Gul
2:20:43 Hanende Agyazar Efendi – Kessik Kerem
2:22:05 Tommy Dorsey – Dawn On The Desert
(Clip from Philo T Farnsworth – The Birth of Television)
(Clip from Ninotchka)
(Clip from The Man In The Iron Mask)
(Clip from Mr Smith Goes to Washington)
2:24:35 Johnny Hodges (Ellington) – Dooji Wooji
(Clip from Only Angels Have Wings)
2:27:17 Coleman Hawkins – Body And Soul


2:30:14 Larry Clinton; Bea Wain – Deep Purple
(Clip from Gone with the Wind)
2:32:30 Chick Webb – Undecided
(Clip from Swing Dance In Secret)
2:35:46 Coleman Hawkins – Fine Dinner
(Clip from Midnight)
2:38:15 Carmen Miranda – South American Way
2:40:02 Dorival Caymmi – O Que É Que A Baiana Tem
2:43:00 Francisco Alves – Aquarela Do Brasil
2:44:59 The Growler – Trinidad Loves To Play Carnival
(Clip from Rules of the Game)
2:47:33 The Atilla – La Reine Maribone
2:49:26 Cab Calloway & His Orchestra – The Jumping Jive
(Clip from Ninotchka)
2:51:36 Bram Martin – Chopsticks (Vocal – Bob Howard)
(Clip from The Women)
2:52:38 Slim Gaillard – Matzoh Balls
2:54:45 George Formby – Sweet Sue, Just You
2:56:06 Arthur Askey – The Worm
2:58:11 Flanagan & Allen – Run, Rabbit, Run


3:00:53 Johnny & Jones – We Hoeven Niet Te Hamsteren
3:02:48 Andrews Sisters – Beer Barrel Polka
(Clip from The Voder – Homer Dudley Bell Labs)
3:05:05 Pyi Hla Pe – Shwe-Tanga
3:07:54 Will Bradley Trio – Down The Road A Piece
(Clip from Lou Gehrigs 1939 Radio Interview While at the Mayo Clinic on 1340 KROC AM)
3:10:57 Fats Waller – Your Feet’s Too Big
3:13:59 Rex Stewart (Ellington) – Fat Stuff Serenade
(Clip from Machine Made Voices)
3:15:52 See There Singing Band Kumasi – Anoma Oreko
3:17:52 Be Sackey’s Band Of Appam – Nkyrinna
3:18:41 Kpagon Band Accra – Ba Wo Ni Aya Ye
3:20:43 Lead Belly – Fannin Street
3:22:25 Pete Johnson – Barrelhouse Breakdown
(Clip from The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
3:24:00 Andy Kirk And His Twelve Clouds Of Joy – Floyd’s Guitar Blues
3:27:05 Edward Heyman & The Les Paul Trio – Out Of Nowhere
3:29:56 Stéphane Grapelli – Baby


3:32:36 Glenn Miller – Moonlight Serenade
(Clip from Of Mice and Men)
(Clip from Goodbye Mr Chips)
3:37:09 Debutantes & MGM Studio Orchestra – Optimistic Voices
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
3:38:02 MGM Studio Orchestra- March Of The Winkies
(Clip from 1939-08-27 BBC Czech Ambassador In London On Poland Situation)
3:39:08 Toscanini, NBC Orchestra – Beethoven 3 Symph. Funeral March
(Clip from 1939-08-28 – CBS Coverage on the Eve of WWII)
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
(Clip from 1939-08-31 BBC Alvar Liddell Reports On German 16 Point Plan)
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
(Clip from 1939-09-01 State Of Armed Conflict With Poland)
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
3:42:40 Pablo Casals – Bach No. 5 In C Minor – I- Prelude (Adagio – Allegro Moderato)
(Clip from 1939-09-01 BBC Alvar Liddell Reports The Invasion Of Poland)
(Clip from 1939-09-01 BBC Ignace Paderewski On The War Looming Before Poland)
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
(Clip from 1939-09-03 BBC Britain Declares War On Germany)
(Clip from 1939-09-03 BBC Prime Minister Chamberlain Declares War On Germany)
3:46:24 Max Steiner – The Death Of Melanie
(Clip from 1939-09-03 BBC King George VI Addresses The Nation)
(Clip from 1939-09-03 BBC Places Of Entertainment To Be Closed)
3:50:30 Toscanini, NBC Orchestra – Beethoven 3 Symph. Funeral March
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
3:53:05 Django Reinhardt – Echoes Of Spain
(Clip from 1939-09-01 BBC Alvar Liddell Reports On Evacuation Of Children)
(Clip from 1939-09-01 BBC S J de Lotbiniére Reports Further On Evacuation)
(Clip from 1939-09-01 BBC S J de Lotbiniére Reports Train Now Leaving)
3:54:22 Bert Ambrose – Nasty Uncle Adolf (Vocal – Jack Cooper)
(Clip from 1939-09-10 BBC Evacuee Message To Parents)
3:56:50 Judy Garland – Over The Rainbow
(Clip from 1939-10-13 BBC Children’s Hour Broadcast By Princess Elizabeth)


4:00:04 Art Tatum – Over The Rainbow
4:00:27 MGM Studio Orchestra – Terrified Lion
(Clip from Adolf Hitler – Speech – 1939-09-22 – Poland and it’s imminent defeat)
4:01:01 Max Steiner – Soldiers In Retreat
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
4:02:20 Toscanini, NBC Orchestra – Beethoven 3 Symph. Funeral March
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
4:03:17 Pablo Casals – Bach No. 4 In E Flat – I- Prelude (Allegro Maestoso)
(Clip from 1939-10-01 BBC Winston Churchill – The First Month of the War)
4:05:27 Golden Eagle Gospel Singers – A Warrior On The Battlefield
4:08:02 Golden Gate Jubilee Quartet – Precious Lord
4:10:33 Roland Hayes – ‘Roun’ ‘Bout De Mountain
4:11:59 Duke Ellington – Informal Blues
(Clip from 1939-10-15 (BBC Richard Dimbleby) By a French Road)
4:14:21 Art Tatum – Deep Purple
(Clip from 1939-11-11 BBC Queen Elizabeth – Fortitude Of Women)
4:17:35 John Kirby – Dawn On The Desert
4:20:21 Django Reinhardt – Echoes Of Spain
(Clip from Review of the Year 1939)
4:21:39 Victor Young – The Scroll And The Storm
(Clip from 1939-12-18 BBC Winston Churchill – The Sinking Of The Graf Spee)
(Clip from HM King George VI – The Royal Christmas Message of 1939)
4:23:58 Lale Andersen – Lili Marlen
(Clip from HM King George VI – The Royal Christmas Message of 1939)
4:27:39 Vera Lynn – We’ll Meet Again (Novachord – Arthur Young)
(Clip from The Roaring Twenties)

1938 Preview – The Munich Crisis

At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. This is one of the ten chapters in the full version of Centuries of Sound 1938
To get the whole mix as a podcast, and a load of other extras, sign up for five dollars per month at http://patreon.com/centuriesofsound

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One of the worst crimes of the nostalgia business is to transform the worst traumas our civilization has suffered into light entertainment, and for this reason I didn’t feel it appropriate to mix coverage of Hitler’s rise with any sort of jazz. Instead, the events of late 1938 – the invasion of Czechoslovakia, the Munich peace conference, the triumphant hubris of Neville Chamberlain and, it turns out, the British and international media – seem to fit better with the more sombre classical music recorded this year.

For all the creative energy released in 1938, it is ultimately a year remembered for its complacency, not just that of the British government, but from a western world which feels it is through the worst, while a “quarrel in a far away country, between people of whom we know nothing” is not something worth worrying about. Next year we will see that focus being sharply pulled.

Radio Podcast #14 – 1906

bert-williams-600

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Another journey back in time with James Errington bringing you original historic recordings, this time from 1906, the year of the San Francisco earthquake. We have a brace of songs from the brilliant Bert Williams, plenty of music hall and vaudeville, and a performance of Scott Joplin’s Maple Leaf Rag from Sousa’s Band.

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1938 Preview – War of The Worlds

At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. This is one of the ten chapters in the full version of Centuries of Sound 1938
To get the whole mix as a podcast, and a load of other extras, sign up for five dollars per month at http://patreon.com/centuriesofsound

MP3 preview download | Patreon | Apple | Mixcloud | Spotify | Castbox | Stitcher | RSS

Certainly the most famous episode of The Mercury Theatre on the Air, Orson Wells’ adaptation of H.G. Wells’ (no relation) science fiction novel caused a scandal on broadcast when it allegedly caused panicked listeners to flee to the hills. The people actually fleeing or even complaining in vast numbers appear to have been an invention of some sort, certainly the main change when the dust settled was that Orson Wells was now well-known nationwide and able to pick up his first directing work, and I’m sure everyone knows what that is. From my POV the most interesting thing about War of the Worlds is the way it combines fantastic elements with an imitation of a standard radio programme with breaks for a live broadcast of light music. Here we have most of the first half of the drama, with the music swapped for more interesting lighter dance music from 1938, plenty of it from the UK, and at least some of it re-used later by Leyland Kirkby for his The Caretaker project.

00:00 Raymond Scott Quintette – The Happy Farmer
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
00:57 Russ Morgan – What Do You Know About Love
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
02:47 Leslie Hutchinson – It’s De Lovely
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
04:11 Geraldo – You’re As Pretty As A Picture
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
09:00 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Pray For The Lights To Go Out
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
12:17 Harry Roy – Highland Swing (Vocal – Ray Ellington)
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
19:02 Unknown Mahafaly – Flute Solo (Ampanihy, Madagascar)
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
21:05 Prof. Anukul Ch. Das – Piano Instrumental- Ramprasad Sen
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
25:20 Bruno Walter & Wiener Philharmoniker – Gustav Mahler Symphony No. 9
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
33:37 Artie Shaw And His Orchestra – Nightmare
(Clips from Orson Welles Press Conference)

1938

At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. The download here is only for the first hour of the mix. For the full 3.5-hour version please come to centuriesofsound.com to stream, or patreon.com/centuriesofsound for downloads and a host of other bonus materials for just $5 per month. This show would not be possible without my supporters on there, so please consider signing up or sharing this with someone who may be interested.

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Ten stories from 1938

Part One – The Famous Carnegie Hall Concert

1938 opens with perhaps the most famous Jazz concert of all time. Every five years it is my duty to report that “Jazz has gone mainstream” but this might really be it – never before has the genre been so accepted as a national music across spectra of race and class, and after a brief plateau, it’s all going to splinter and decline (commercially – certainly not artistically!) from this point on. The concert at Carnegie Hall January 16th was held by Benny Goodman – a clarinettist and band leader who looked, and dressed, like a befuddled office clerk in a Howard Hawks movie – and an all-star ensemble. Goodman had already been recording in a trio with drummer Gene Krupa, pianist Teddy Wilson, and a quartet also featuring Lionel Hampton, and took the opportunity to massively expand on this with every other big name of the day. It’s hard to convey the novelty of a racially-integrated jazz act playing in public at all, let alone in Carnegie Hall. Such a thing would have been completely unthinkable even five years earlier.

Much like Paul Whiteman’s 1924 concert which introduced Rhapsody in Blue, the show began with a history of jazz – this time with a marginally more accurate starting point of the “dixieland” era of the early 20s. Then through the two hours the pace began to build with a number of special guests, including the Duke Ellington and Count Basie orchestras, until finally the Goodman Quartet blitzed through their hits. The program had been wisely planned, with muted reception for the first half an hour winding up to demands for several encores at the end. Three recordings were made, two acetates and one set of aluminium discs – this may seem like a minor detail, but it has been important to the making of this mix because the lower-fidelity acetates were the source for the 1950 LP of the concert, and the CD version currently available is a direct rip from the higher-fidelity aluminium master, which archivist Phil Schaap put together in the late 1990s, and which I find to be almost unlistenable because he apparently refused to do any kind of restoration work, resulting in scraping and hissing noises being present through most of the two CDs. For this mix, then, I have combined the two versions, adding extra fidelity to sections of the old record and doing mostly eq-based noise reduction on the CD version. It still isn’t perfect, but right now it’s the best sound you’re going to get.

Part Two – Countless Blues

The late thirties, after the death of Robert Johnson, is one of the least-heralded eras for the blues – but it really shouldn’t be. Half a decade before jazz artists started playing jump blues, here we are with electric guitars, boogie-woogie rhythms and dance arrangements. Call it one of the many births of rock & roll if you like – there’s certainly a great deal here which wouldn’t feel out of place in the fifties, Georgia slide blues from Tampa Red and Georgia White, Chicago blues from Washboard Sam, Piedmont blues from Blind Boy Fuller and proto-R&B from Big Bill Broonzy and Jazz Gillum.

Part Three – Mein Rhythmus

A European tour, starting in the music halls of England, then Finnish accordion, Romanian violin and German dance bands, before settling down into a five-track exploration of French singers. Charles Trenet gives us one last taste of optimism before the events of 1939, Edith Piaf on the other hand, has a military song. Rina Ketty, an Italian, sings “J’attendrai” (“I will wait”), a translation of an Italian song, which later became emblematic of World War II, summing up the anxious longing of women awaiting the safe return of their sons and husbands from the war. Deanna Durbin was another immigrant to France, though luckily for her she was still in Hollywood at this point – and there’s Marie-Jacques Renée “Jacotte” Perrier, aged only 13, performing with the Hot Club De France – we will be hearing more from them in time. We finish our European tour with Johnny & Jones, Jewish jazz-pop artists from Amsterdam, both of whom would sadly become some of the final victims of the Holocaust.

Part Four – Algiers

This selection of Middle-Eastern and African music begins in Bulgaria, before moving on to Turkey (including Turkish-Armenian oud virtuoso Udi Hrant) and Algerian singer Cheikh Zouzou. The 1938 movie Algiers (a remake of 1937 French film Pépé le Moko) depicted a fantasied version of the native quarter of Algiers known as the Casbah – while it is certainly guilty of exoticism, and possibly a lot worse, the film is notable for bringing Hedy Lamarr to the attention of American audiences. The African section features Africans in Brasil, recorded by Mário de Andrade, and East African and Nigerian recordings about which I can find very little information – please let me know if you have anything on these artists.

Part Five – Vitalogy

A tour around the Caribbean and elsewhere, we start with Carmen Miranda, perhaps the biggest star ever to come from Brasil’s Samba scene – she would move to the USA and begin her screen career the following year. Off then to Cuba, with “Guantanamera,” perhaps the best-known song from the island, with lyrics by the Cuban poet José Martí and music by Joseíto Fernández, and another adaptation of Son music by Xavier Cugat for the American public. We have a trio of recordings from Trinidad, where Portuguese music promotor Sa Gomes is doing his best to support, record and promote the genre – one track from Carnival’s Vagabonds is a tribute to the man himself – and a little Hawaiian music, now finally fading away from the popularity and influence it has had for the last two decades.

Part Six – Stepping Into Swing Society

The first of two overviews of Swing in 1938, this one begins with some gospel music and preaching (of course this is not swing, but bear with me) in order to introduce “Reverend Sachmo” who kicks off some of the hotter jazz selections from the year. Famous names here include Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton, Count Basie, Chick Webb and Tommy Dorsey – the only slightly more obscure name is that of Pee Wee Russell. The chapter concludes with a few novelty swing records, from two different groups of Hot Shots and the Raymond Scott Quintette.

Part Seven – War of The Worlds

Certainly the most famous episode of The Mercury Theatre on the Air, Orson Welles’ adaptation of H.G. Wells’ (no relation) science fiction novel caused a scandal on broadcast when it allegedly caused panicked listeners to flee to the hills. The people actually fleeing or even complaining in vast numbers appear to have been an invention of some sort, certainly the main change when the dust settled was that Orson Welles was now well-known nationwide and able to pick up his first directing work, and I’m sure everyone knows what that is. From my POV the most interesting thing about War of the Worlds is the way it combines fantastic elements with an imitation of a standard radio programme with breaks for a live broadcast of light music. Here we have most of the first half of the drama, with the music swapped for more interesting lighter dance music from 1938, plenty of it from the UK, and at least some of it re-used later by Leyland Kirkby for his The Caretaker project.

Part Eight – Did You Ever Milk A Cow?

Folk and country music has had as hard a time as country blues over the course of the great depression, but it is also finding ways to adapt to the new world. Some, like the Hackberry Rambers are working with a niche market, Some, like the Dezurik Sisters, are making as an extreme an impression as possible to grab as much attention as they can (despite being a fairly traditional yodelling record, “Arizona Yodeler” is one of the most out there things in the entire mix.) For the most part, however, this is a run-through of the early days of “western swing” – essentially just swing made by white musicians in the former wild west, with the horns sometimes (but not always) switched for fiddles, and, as of this year, electric guitars.

Part Nine – When The Sun Sets Down South

Drawing towards our conclusion, this chapter covers some of the more relaxed and vocal swing records of the year, including some of the biggest hits. Ella Fitzgerald adapted A-Tisket, A-Tasket from a nursery rhyme, and Count Basie joined in the fun with his “Stop Beatin’ ’round The Mulberry Bush” – selections from Billie Holiday are also notably relaxed and reassuring in tone, especially when compared to her recordings from 1939. It isn’t all smooth classics here, though. Django Reinhardt provides one of his most curious recordings, Sugii Kōichi has more Spanish-tinged Japanese lounge jazz, and Bob Haggart & Ray Bauduc play Big Noise From Winnetka, one of those records you’ve known all your life, but never knew the name.

Part Ten – Munich

Much of the time spent on this mix was dedicated to trying to judge the tone of this final section. I can’t promise that it has been done perfectly, but practice was needed, considering everything I will need to include on the next seven mixes. One of the worst crimes of the nostalgia business is to transform the worst traumas our civilization has suffered into light entertainment, and for this reason I didn’t feel it appropriate to mix coverage of Hitler’s rise with any sort of jazz. Instead, the events of late 1938 – the invasion of Czechoslovakia, the Munich peace conference, the triumphant hubris of Neville Chamberlain and, it turns out, the British and international media – seem to fit better with the more sombre classical music recorded this year.

For all the creative energy released in 1938, it is ultimately a year remembered for its complacency, not just that of the British government, but from a western world which feels it is through the worst, while a “quarrel in a far away country, between people of whom we know nothing” is not something worth worrying about. Next year we will see that focus being sharply pulled.

Tracklist

Part One – The Famous Carnegie Hall Concert

0:00:00 Carl Stalling – Warner Brothers Intro
0:00:20 The Benny Goodman Orchestra – China Boy
(Clip from Pygmalion)
0:04:10 The Benny Goodman Orchestra – Dizzy Spells
0:08:33 The Benny Goodman Orchestra – Sing Sing Sing (With A Swing)
(Clip from You Can’t Take It With You)

Part Two – Countless Blues

(Clip from Review Of The Year)
0:13:02 Georgia White – The Blues Ain’t Nothin’ But…!!!
(Clip from Peg-Leg Pedro)
0:15:44 Big Bill Broonzy – Trucking Little Woman
(Clip from How To Undress In Front Of Your Husband)
0:17:10 Kansas City Six – Countless Blues
(Clip from The Shadow 38-02-13 The House Of Horror)
0:20:07 Bob Crosby – Honky Tonk Train Blues
(Clip from Andy Hardy)
0:22:01 Blind Boy Fuller – Step It Up And Go
(Clip from A Slight Case of Murder)
0:23:16 Tampa Red – Rock It In Rhythm
(Clip from Bringing Up Baby)
0:25:23 Jazz Gillum & His Jazz Boys – Reefer Head Woman
(Clip from How To Undress In Front Of Your Husband)
0:27:17 Washboard Sam – Don’t Leave Me Here
(Clip from La Bete Humaine)
(Clip from Four Daughters)
0:29:51 Blind Boy Fuller – Get Your Yas Yas Out
(Clip from Always Goodbye)
0:32:13 Hudson ‘Tampa Red’ Whittaker – Forgive Me Please

Part Three – Mein Rhythmus

(Clip from A Christmas Carol Trailer)
0:35:02 Tommy Trinder – I Don’t Do Things Like That
(Clip from Adele England – Chestnut Tree)
0:37:00 George Formby – In My Little Snapshot Album
(Clip from The King’s Speech)
0:38:56 Viola Turpeinen – Kahden Venheessä
(Clip from Kerensky interview)
0:40:14 Georges Boulanger – Tokay
(Clip from BBC Interview with Sigmund Freud)
0:42:14 Heinz Munsonius – Mein Rhythmus
0:43:30 Heinz Rühmann – Ich Brech Die Herzen Der Stolzesten Fraun
0:44:21 Charles Trenet – Boum!
0:46:13 Jacotte Perrier + Hot Club De France – Les Salades De L’ Oncle Francois
(Clip from La Femme du Boulanger)
0:48:25 Rina Ketty – J’ Attendrai
(Clip from Port of Shadows)
0:50:28 Edith Piaf – Le Fanion De La Legion
0:52:05 Deanna Durbin – Les Filles De Cadix
(Clip from Lou Bandy – Conference Vergeten)
0:53:18 Johnny & Jones – Lied Van Den Slangenbezweerder (Snake Charmer)

Part Four – Algiers

0:54:51 Vulkana Stoyanova – Dimo Na Rada
0:56:55 Udi Hrant – Kurdili Hicazkar Taksim
(Clip from “The Speech Of Ancient Egypt, 18th Dynasty”)
0:58:00 Cheikh Zouzou – Gheniet Ben Soussan, Pt. 7
(Clip from Algiers)
1:00:37 Kemani Haydar Tatliyay – Arap Oyun Havasi
1:02:09 Mário De Andrade – Instrumentos Do ‘Caboclinho Índios Africanos’
1:02:23 J.P. Nyangira – Hongo Owiti
1:04:28 Godwin Scotland – Adelebo Ilu Eko
(Clip from Algiers)

Part Five – Vitalogy

1:05:37 Carmen Miranda – Boneca De Pixe
(Clip from The Citadel)
1:07:05 Cuarteto Caney – Guajira Guantanamera
1:09:53 Xavier Cugat – La Paloma
(Clip from The Adventures of Robin Hood)
1:13:35 The Caresser – Clear The Way When The Bamboo Play
1:15:23 The Lion – Vitalogy
1:15:45 Carnival’s Vagabonds – We Want Sa Gomes
(Clip from Jezebel)
1:16:34 Mannie Klein’s Swing-A-Hula’s – Hoolihi Oe Ke Ike Mai

Part Six – Stepping Into Swing Society

(Clip from Angels With Dirty Faces)
1:20:17 Golden Gate Jubilee Quartet – John The Revelator
1:21:22 Rev. Benny Campbell – You Must Be Born Again
1:22:43 Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra – When The Saints Go Marching In
(Clip from American Air Record – Interview With Pilot)
1:24:20 Pee Wee Russell – I’ve Found A New Baby
(Clip from Alexander’s Ragtime Band)
1:25:45 Lionel Hampton & His Orchestra – Downhome Jump
(Clip from The Sisters)
1:28:20 Duke Ellington – Stepping Into Swing Society
(Clip from Bringing Up Baby)
1:31:17 Tommy Dorsey – Boogie Woogie
(Clip from Bringing Up Baby)
1:33:21 Count Basie – Jumpin’ At The Woodside
(Clip from Mr Moto’s Gamble)
1:36:28 Chick Webb & His Orchestra – Harlem Congo
1:39:38 Joe Daniels Hot Shots – Limehouse Blues
(Clip from Too Hot To Handle – Trailer)
1:42:44 Hoosier Hot Shots – The Girl Friend Of The Whirling Dervish
(Clip from Bringing Up Baby)
1:45:04 Raymond Scott Quintette – The Happy Farmer

Part Seven – War of The Worlds

(Clip from War of the Worlds)
1:48:03 Russ Morgan – What Do You Know About Love
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
1:49:53 Leslie Hutchinson – It’s De Lovely
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
1:51:18 Geraldo – You’re As Pretty As A Picture
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
1:56:06 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Pray For The Lights To Go Out
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
1:59:24 Harry Roy – Highland Swing (Vocal – Ray Ellington)
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
2:06:08 Unknown Mahafaly – Flute Solo (Ampanihy, Madagascar)
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
2:08:11 Prof. Anukul Ch. Das – Piano Instrumental- Ramprasad Sen
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
2:12:26 Bruno Walter & Wiener Philharmoniker – Gustav Mahler Symphony No. 9
(Clip from War of the Worlds)
2:20:42 Artie Shaw And His Orchestra – Nightmare
(Clips from Orson Welles Press Conference)

Part Eight – Did You Ever Milk A Cow?

(Clip from The Adventures of Robin Hood)
2:24:24 Hackberry Ramblers – Fais Pas Ca
(Clip from Adele England – Chestnut Tree)
2:26:06 Coon Creek Girls – Old Uncle Dudy (Keep Fiddling On)
(Clip from Merrily We Live)
2:28:30 The Monroe Brothers – Have A Feast Here Tonight
(Clip from Boys Town)
2:29:30 Dezurik Sisters – Arizona Yodeler
2:31:52 Cliff Bruner – When You’re Smiling
2:33:31 Light Crust Doughboys – Pussy Pussy Pussy
(Clip from Test Pilot)
2:37:05 Roy Acuff & His Crazy Tennesseans – Wabash Cannonball
(Clip from Holiday)
2:38:40 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Liza, Pull Down The Shades
(Clip from Mind The Doors)
2:41:12 Judy Garland – Cry Baby Cry

Part Nine – When The Sun Sets Down South

2:43:42 Count Basie – Stop Beatin’ ’round The Mulberry Bush
(Clip from AT&T – Operator)
2:45:38 Ella Fitzgerald feat. Chick Webb And His Orchestra – A-Tisket, A-Tasket
2:48:10 Sidney Bechet & Noble Sissle’s Swingsters – Blackstick
(Clip from Kerensky interview)
2:50:56 Duke Ellington – Pyramid (Part 2)
(Clip from Four Daughters)
2:54:09 Andy Kirk & Mary Lou Williams – Twinklin’
(Clip from You Can’t Take It With You)
2:56:40 Lionel Hampton & His Orchestra – Any Time At All
(Clip from CBS WBBM World Series Game 2 NY Yankees vs Chicago Cubs)
2:58:13 Django Reinhardt – Improvisation No. 2
(Clip from CBS WBBM World Series Game 2 NY Yankees vs Chicago Cubs)
(Clip from The Lady Vanishes)
3:00:18 Bob Haggart & Ray Bauduc – Big Noise From Winnetka
3:02:59 Sugii Kōichi – Kusatsu-bushi
(Clip from NBC ATMOTA – Is an Economic Plan for World Peace Available?)
3:05:21 Fats Waller – Waterboy
3:05:34 Django Reinhardt – Appel Indirect (Appel Direct)
(Clip from A Slight Case of Murder)
3:08:30 Noble Sissle’s Swingsters – When The Sun Sets Down South
3:11:33 Teddy Wilson And His Orchestra – When You’re Smiling
3:14:21 Hot Lips Page – Rock It For Me
3:17:10 Billie Holiday – You Go To My Head
(Clip from A Slight Case of Murder)

Part Ten – Munich

3:20:02 The Lord Executor – Poppy Day
(Clip from Inside Nazi Germany March of Time newsreel)
3:21:26 Pablo Casals – No. 1 In G – I- Prelude (Moderato)
(Clip from Inside Nazi Germany March of Time newsreel)
3:22:44 Pablo Casals – Dvorak Cello Concerto In B 03 Allegro Moderato
(Clip from Inside Nazi Germany March of Time newsreel)
(Clip from Inside Nazi Germany March of Time newsreel)
(Clip from 1938-02-03 NBC ATMOTA – What Does Democracy Mean?)
3:24:53 Bruno Walter & Wiener Philharmoniker – Gustav Mahler Symphony No. 9
(Clip from Hitler In Vienna – British Pathé)
(Clip from German Propaganda Film)
(Clip from Winston Churchill – ‘We Must Arm’ Speech)
3:27:38 Herbert Von Karajan – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Ouvertüre Zu ‘die Zauberflöte’ (Excerpt 1)
(Clip from Review Of The Year)
(Clip from Peace Four Power Conference)
(Clip from Neville Chamberlain – Speech On His Return From The Munich Conference)
(Clip from Peace Four Power Conference)
3:30:17 NBC Symphony Orchestra – Adagio For Strings Op.11
(Clip from Adolf Hitler – on the occasion of the german occupation of the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia)
(Clip from 1938-12-01 NBC ATMOTA – Is an Economic Plan for World Peace Available?)
(Clip from 1938-12-08 NBC ATMOTA – How Should the Democracies Deal With the Dictatorships?)
3:35:03 Herbert Von Karajan – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Ouvertüre Zu ‘die Zauberflöte’ (Excerpt 2)
(Clip from Review Of The Year)
3:36:00 Flanagan & Allen – Umbrella Man
(Clip from You Can’t Take It With You)
3:38:36 Ella Logan – Adios Muchachos
3:40:12 Carl Stalling – Warner Brothers Outro
(Clip from Angels with Dirty Faces)

Radio Podcast #13 – 1905

Byron_photographic_staff_1905

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Another sonic adventure through time with James Errington, this time joined by guests Dominic, Joanne & Adam to listen to the sounds of 1905 and discuss such pressing topics as skeleton xylophones, the hubris of Dick Dastardly, melancholy in Spanish music, the latter-day lack of songs about bears in pop music and, for some reason, collared doves, which are definitely a type of pigeon.

Centuries of Sound is an independent podcast without any advertising, and it’s only with the support of my patrons that the show can survive. To download full mixes, get early access to the radio podcast, and a get host of other benefits for $5 (or local equivalent) per month, please come to https://patreon.com/centuriesofsound

1937

At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. The download here is only for the first hour of the mix. For the full 3.5-hour version please come to centuriesofsound.com to stream, or patreon.com/centuriesofsound for downloads and a host of other bonus materials for just $5 per month. This show would not be possible without my supporters on there, so please consider signing up or sharing this with someone who may be interested.

MP3 preview download | Patreon | Apple | Mixcloud | Spotify | Castbox | Stitcher | RSS

Recorded music has a centre of gravity, and it’s usually New York. Now and again, though, we have seen it temporarily shift – to New Orleans and to Chicago, and now, in one of the peak years of swing, we find ourselves in Paris, near to the closing moments of the Third Republic, with two Belgian-Romani guitarists, a French-Italian violin player, a French double-bass player and a French guitarist. This group of musicians recorded under a variety of names (and with a host of other musicians) but are best-remembered as Quintette du Hot Club de France.

The most well-known of this Quintette is almost certainly Django Reinhardt. Born to Romani-Belgian parents, Django played the guitar (initially a banjo-guitar) from the age of 12, but otherwise had little in the way of education. He was almost-completely illiterate until late into his life, and managed to spend a year in New York despite speaking no English. If that were not enough disadvantages to be dealing with, in 1928 he suffered severe burns after his caravan caught fire, and ended up spending 18 months in hospital, losing two of the fingers on his left hand. With only three fingers left to form chords, Django had to devise for himself an entirely new way to play the guitar. Inspired by Eddie Lang, the father of jazz guitar (sadly the two never played together as Lang died during a routine tonsillectomy in 1933) he was soon traveling throughout France, playing in any bar or club that could pay him. It was in one of these that he first met jazz violinist Stéphane Grappelli.

I remember seeing Stéphane Grappelli on TV when I was very young, and was impressed enough to ask for an LP, which I did not really listen to. Nevertheless, it was my first introduction to jazz. Grapelli’s French mother died when he was five, and his Italian father was drafted into the army when he was six. He was passed first to Isadora Duncan’s dance school, then to a Dickensian orphanage, and only rescued when his father returned at the end of the war. Like Reinhardt, Grapelli had an instrument bought for him at the age of 12 – a violin bought by his father after pawning a suit – and while he did attend the the Conservatoire de Paris for a time, he was mostly self-taught. Aside from a short spell where he bafflingly shifted to piano, Grapelli’s life from the age of 15 was spent mostly playing violin professionally, first in a silent movie theatre, and after a few years in concerts put on by a student organisation for the promotion of jazz in France, the “Hot Club de France”

Reinhardt and Grapelli’s playing is still, 85 years later, without equal. Their antecedents are, naturally, Eddie Lang and Joe Venuti, but while that pair made some beautiful records, the way the Hot Club stretch this simple combination of instruments into such a vast array of styles, displaying such effortless virtuosity, well, it’s just breathtaking. Reinhard combines the melodies of Lang with the faster rhythms of Romani music, turning this formerly decorative, textual instument into the lead, the centre of the sound. At times his playing is dizzyingly avant-garde, but often also distinctly melodic in a very late-20th-century sort of way. Grapelli, meanwhile, grabs anything Reinhard throws at him, his improvisation described by Yehudi Menuhin as “like one of those jugglers who send 10 plates into the air and recovers them all.”

Well, I still haven’t written anything about Michel Warlop, or Josephine Baker, or Charles Trenet, or Rina Ketty, all recording in Paris this year, and yes, of course there was still a great deal going on elsewhere, and, well, you’ll just have to listen to find out.

January

0:00:00 Maurice Jaubert – Dream Sequence from Un Carnet De Bal
(Clip of Elizabeth Lomax)
(Clip from Double Wedding)
(Clip from On The Air)
0:00:52 Benny Goodman & his Orchestra – Sing, Sing, Sing
(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)
0:04:22 The Raymond Scott Quintette – Powerhouse
(Clip from 1937-01-05 NBC Opening Day of 75th Congress)
0:06:52 Django Reinhardt Et Le Quintette Du Hot Club De France, Avec Stéphane Grappelli – Mystery Pacific
(Clip of NBC chimes)
0:08:52 The Golden Gate Jubilee Quartet – Found A Wonderful Savior
(Clip of 1937-01-18 CBS March of Time)
0:11:20 Xavier Cugat – Bim Bam Bum
(Clip of 1937-01-18 CBS March of Time)
0:13:26 Lionel Hampton And His Orchestra – China Stomp (Chinatown, My Chinatown)
(Clip of 1937-01-18 CBS March of Time)
0:16:15 Ivor Moreton & Dave Kaye – Polly & Nola
(Clip of 1937-01-27 WFBR Xmitting WSM – Flood Coverage)

February

0:19:11 Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – Caravan
(Clip from Orson Welles Screen test)
0:21:52 Django Reinhardt – Improvisation / Sweet Georgia Brown
(Clip from 1937-02-06 MBS Kay Kyser Live from the Trianon Ballroom Chicago)
0:26:56 Jimmie Lunceford – For Dancers Only
(Clip from On The Air)
0:28:40 Udi Hrant – Huzzam Taksim
(Clip from On The Air)
0:29:51 Vulkana Stoyanova – Dimo Na Rada
(Clip from 1937-02-27 Seabiscuit – Santa Anita)
0:32:04 Jimmie Revard & His Oklahoma Boys – Fox And Hounds
(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)

March

0:34:53 Atilla The Hun – Roosevelt In Trinidad
(Clip from 1937-03-04 FDR Second Inaugural Address)
0:37:43 Benny Goodman Quartet – Bei Mir Bist Du Schon – Part 2
0:38:33 Andrews Sisters – Bei Mir Bist Du Schon
(Clip from 1937-03-18 MBS Duke Ellington Live from the Cotton Club)
0:42:02 Cootie Williams (Ellington) – Pigeons And Peppers
(Clip from 1937-03-18 MBS Duke Ellington Live from the Cotton Club)
0:45:26 Billie Holiday – My Man
(Clip from The Shadow – Circle Of Death)
0:48:41 Robert Johnson – Me And The Devil Blues (Take 2)
(Clip from Marked Woman)
0:51:11 Artie Shaw – Blues Part 1
(Clip from A Day At The Races)

April

0:53:07 Peetie Wheatstraw – Peetie Wheatstraw Stomp
(Clip from The Cinnamon Bear)
0:55:40 Count Basie – Exactly Like You
(Clip from 1937-04-18 CBS We The People Dinosaur Tracks)
0:58:33 Ciro Rimac – Yo Me Ba
(Clip from 1937-04-18 CBS We The People Dinosaur Tracks)
1:01:40 Kucuk Nezihe Hanim And Sukru Tunar – Agladim Aci Cektim
(Clip from 1937-04-18 CBS We The People Dinosaur Tracks)
1:03:29 Michel Warlop – Taj Mahal (Orchestre + Django Reinhardt)
(Clip from 1937-04-19 PTT General Franco Cree La Phalange Espagnole a Salamanque)
1:07:02 Secco’s Gitano’s – Hora
(Clip from A Day At The Races)
1:09:10 Hoosier Hot Shots – Goofus

May

(Clip from Maytime)
1:11:57 Vanvakaris Markos – Taksimi Zeimpekiko
(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)
(Clip from 1937-05-06 WLS Hindenberg Disaster Herbert Morrison)
1:15:31 Frank Churchill, Paul J. Smith & Leigh Harline – Magic Mirror
(Clip from 1937-05 RRG Cpt Hans von Schiller – Lakehurst Memorial Service)
1:16:36 Marlene Dietrich – Lili Marlene
(Clip of Charles Laughton)
1:18:19 The Caresser – Edward The VII
(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)
1:20:18 Executor – Reign Of The Georges
(Clip of Charles Laughton)
1:21:51 Fats Waller – Tea For Two
(Clip of 1937-05-20 Tommy Woodrooffe on a Royal Navy Fleet Review)
1:25:15 Django Reinhardt – Swing Guitars

June

1:26:19 Frank Churchill, Paul J. Smith & Leigh Harline – I’m Wishing
1:27:34 Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers – Let’s Call The Whole Thing Off
(Clip from Pathe Gazette Presents The Derby 1937)
1:30:08 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Right Or Wrong
(Clip from Saratoga)
1:33:07 Harlem Hamfats – Root Hog Or Die
(Clip from Meet the Girl who Became a Man, Australian Cinesound newsreel)
1:35:17 Sosyete Boumba, Marileanne Joseph – Ezili Si Ou Mande Manje, Map Bayou Li
(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)
1:36:38 Septeto Anacaona – Oh! Marambé Maramba
(Clip from Angel)
1:37:26 Peter Kreuder – Shall We Dance (Solisten)

July

(Clip from On The Air)
1:39:02 Rex Stewart And His 52nd Street Stompers – Back Room Romp
(Clip from Easy Living)
1:41:58 Teddy Wilson And His Orchestra – Sun Showers
(Clip from 1937-07-09 Red Barber – Joe Dimaggio Radio Call)
1:45:19 Ink Spots – Swing High, Swing Low
(Clip from 1937-07-20 MBS WOR Marconi Memorial Program)
1:46:56 T. V. Ramaswami Sastrigal, Vikatam Vidwan, Thiruvisalur – Sky Lark Squirrel Country Oil Mill Red Bird
(Clip from 1937-07-20 MBS WOR Marconi Memorial Program)
1:47:18 Elsie Carlisle – So Many Memories
(Clip from 1937-07-20 MBS WOR Marconi Memorial Program)
1:48:41 Loumé Fréice Of The Sosyete Viyolon – En Avant Simple
(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)
1:49:14 Quintette Du Hot Club De France – Boléro

August

(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)
1:52:16 Akasaka Koume – Asama No Kemuri
(Clip from Song at Midnight)
1:53:50 Zhou Xuan – When Will You Return?
(Clip From 1937-08-27 NBC KGU Interviews With Refugees From China Sino-Japanese War)
1:55:40 Koichi Sugii – Setsu Kagoshima Ohara
1:58:39 Amaunalik K’âvigak’ – Song In A Fable
1:58:48 Raymond Scott – War Dance For Wooden Indians
(Clip from The Shadow 37-11-28 Circle Of Death)
(Clip from Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs)
2:01:51 Count Basie – Boogie Woogie
(Clip from Dead End)
2:04:57 Jones-Smith Incorporated – Shoe Shine Boy

September

(Clip from Dime a Dance)
2:08:02 Nadezhda Zlateva – Slushai Malka Mome
2:09:59 Maurice Jaubert – Dream Sequence from Un Carnet De Bal
2:12:53 Charles Trenet – Je Chante
2:15:23 Josephine Baker – Toc Toc Partout (+ Rogers)
2:17:30 Lou Bandy – Conference Vakantie
2:17:49 Rina Ketty – Le Clocher D’ Amour
(Clip from Pepe le Moko)
2:19:07 Quintette Du Hot Club De France – Mabel

October

2:23:13 William Butler Yeats – The Lake Isle of Innisfree
2:24:20 Arthur Schnabel – Sonata No 4, E Flat Major, Op 7 Largo, Con Gran Espressione
2:26:24 Virginia Woolf – The Recorded Voice Of Virginia Woolf
2:26:45 Carroll Gibbons – There’s A Lull In My Life (Vocal – Anne Lenner)
(Clip from 1937-10-12 NBC Fireside Address FDR)
2:29:42 Django Reinhardt Et Le Quintette Du Hot Club De France, Avec Stéphane Grappelli – Chicago
(Clip from 1937-10-13 CBS Benny Goodman Live from the Hotel Pennsylvania)
2:33:24 Benny Goodman Quartet – Avalon
(Clip from Dime a Dance)
2:36:10 Rof Acuff – Steel Guitar Blues
(Clip from 1937-10-22 NBC Ben Davis Jr)
2:39:36 Ella Fitzgerald feat. Chick Webb And His Orchestra – When I Get Low I Get High
(Clip from Movietone Reviews A Memorable Year 1937)
(Clip of Amelia Earhart On The Future Of Women In Flying)
(Clip from Krazy’s Race of Time)
2:42:34 The Golden Gate Jubilee Quartet – Golden Gate Gospel Train

November

2:45:03 Robert Johnson – Love In Vain Blues (Take 1)
(Clip from Angel)
2:47:32 Kemani Nubar – Bahriye Cifte Telli
(Clip from 1937-11-20 NBCB Believe it or Not Colonel Stoopnagle)
2:49:20 Markos Vamvakaris – Oli I Rembetes Tu Dunia
(Clip from One Hundred Men and a Girl)
2:51:42 Patsy Montana – I Wanna Be A Cowboy’s Sweetheart
(Clip from Lost Horizon)
2:53;34 Group Of Haitian Men And Women, Saul Polinice, Louis Marseille, Ciceron Marseille – Papa Legba Ouvri Baryè-A
2:54:16 W.M. Stepp – Bonaparte’s Retreat
(Clip from Around The Corner – How Differential Steering Works)
2:56:00 Big Joe Williams – Rooting Ground Hog
(Clip from Way Out West)
(Clip from A Star Is Born)
(Clip from Stage Door)
(Clip from Marked Woman)
(Clip from Easy Living)
(Clip from Young & Innocent)
(Clip from Nothing Sacred)
(Clip from A Damsel In Distress)
(Clip from You Only Live Once)
(Clip from A Day At The Races)
(Clip from The Hurriicane)
(Clip from The Good Earth)
3:00:31 Yenz’ Inqab’ Intombi (Zulu; South Africa) – Evening Birds

December

(Clip from 1937-12-12 NBC TCSH Mae West)
3:01:57 Roy Rogers – Cowboy Night Herd Song
(Clip from 1937-12-12 NBC TCSH Mae West)
3:03:40 George Formby – Hi Tiddley Hi Ti Island
(Clip from 1937-12-12 NBC TCSH Mae West)
3:05:29 Bing Crosby – Sweet Lelani
(Clip from 1937-12-12 NBC TCSH Mae West)
3:08:10 Teddy Weatherford – Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Piano Solo)
(Clip from 1937-12-12 NBC TCSH Mae West)
3:10:20 A Jam Session At Victor – Honeysuckle Rose
(Clip from 1937-12-12 NBC TCSH Mae West)
3:13:25 Willie ‘ The Lion ‘ Smith – I’m All Out Of Breath
(Clip from 1937-12-12 NBC TCSH Mae West)
3:16:08 Michel Warlop – Christmas Swing (+ Django Reinhardt & Louis Vola)
(Clip of NBC chimes)

Radio Podcast #12 – 1904

July 1 – The third Modern Olympic Games opens in St. Louis, Missouri, United States as part of the World's Fair

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James Errington takes you on another journey back into the forgotten history of recorded sound, this time joined by Liam Higgins, playing cylinders and shellac all from the year 1904. Aside from the usual brass band, banjo and proto-ragtime and barbershop music, you can listen to the last castrato, find out what a ‘gamp’ is and hear a lengthy excoriation of the worst Olympic Games of all time.

Centuries of Sound is an independent podcast without any advertising, and it’s only with the support of my patrons that the show can survive. To download full mixes, get early access to the radio podcast, and a get host of other benefits for $5 (or local equivalent) per month, please come to https://patreon.com/centuriesofsound

1936

At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. The download here is only for February and March. For the full 3.5-hour version please come to centuriesofsound.com to stream, or patreon.com/centuriesofsound for downloads and a host of other bonus materials for just $5 per month. This show would not be possible without my supporters on there, so please consider signing up or sharing this with someone who may be interested.

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As we journey through the 20th century, another parallel progression is taking place. In the now little remembered days of, 1901, this project involved collecting whatever meagre heavily-mediated artefacts survived and trying to knit them together into a narrative which felt like it made sense. For the long-forgotten years of the Edwardian era, this made sense, but as the devastation of the First World War started, the inadequacy of the sources available became suddenly stark. Who were these dance bands playing hot ragtime, and why were they so completely oblivious to the events going on in Europe? There was a forced myopia, and we just had to put up with it.

But then we had jazz, blues, country, electrical recordings, sound films, radio, newsreels; all expanding the pool of available sounds, cross-fertilizing, widening the pallet. As you know, of course, another war is now approaching. Perhaps it would be hyperbole to say the distant rumbles can be felt throughout these recordings, perhaps this is all in my interpretation and in yours, but this mix does feel to me like a picture of a year, not just a picture of a year’s music.

This, naturally, adds complications. I know very little of the lives of the musicians featured so far. Their contribution has been the joy their music can bring, and at this distant a perspective everything else about their lives – though likely very interesting – is not relevant to the project. This mix, on the other hand, includes the voices of Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin. To leave them out entirely would be to paint a sanitised picture of the year, but it is vital not to let them set the agenda. I have tried, to the best of my ability, to present them each briefly, with appropriate mournfulness or mockery. I can’t promise that I’ve always achieved this as well as I would like, but I promise I have tried.

This tracklisting has been divided up month-by month in order to be more easily digestible.

January – Swing Is Here

0:00:00 NBC Symphony Orchestra – Beethoven’s Symphony No.7 In A Major Op. 92. Ii. Allegretto
(Clips from 1936-01-03 Opening Day of 74th Congress)
0:00:34 Busch Quartet – String Quartet No. 12 In E Flat Op. 127
(Clip from My Man Godfrey)
(Clip from AT&T Archives Introduction to the Dial Telephone)
0:02:21 Gene Krupa – Swing Is Here (+ Benny Goodman)
(Clip from Rose Marie)
0:05:16 Ink Spots – Stompin’ At The Savoy
0:06:17 Benny Goodman & His Orchestra – Stompin’ At The Savoy
(Clip from Reefer Madness)
0:08:28 Memphis Minnie – New Orleans Stop Time
0:11:21 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Steel Guitar Rag
0:14:08 Ciro Rimacs Rumba-Orchester – Maxixe-Carioca

February – Nightmail

(Clip from Disorder in the Court)
0:15:58 Lion – Four Mills Brothers
(Clip from Le Vrai Jeu)
0:18:41 Charles Trenet – Tout Est Au Duc
(Clip from Anthony Adverse)
0:20:56 Django Reinhardt Et Le Quintette Du Hot Club De France, Avec Stéphane Grappelli – Limehouse Blues
0:23:38 W. H. Auden – On This Island
0:24:27 Benjamin Britten, Stuart Legg and John Grierson – Nightmail
0:27:35 The Benny Goodman Quartet – Tiger Rag (Take 1)
(Clip from Cain & Mabel)
0:30:37 Ella Fitzgerald feat. Chick Webb And His Orchestra – Sing Me A Swing Song (And Let Me Dance)
(Clip from Rose Marie)
0:32:24 Jones-Smith Incorporated – Lady Be Good
0:35:29 Slim & Slam – The Flat Foot Floogie

March – There May Be Trouble Ahead

0:38:15 Robert Johnson – Cross Road Blues (Take 2)
(Clip from 1936-03-01 King Edward VIII – The first broadcast to the Empire as King)
0:41:18 Fred Astaire – Let’s Face The Music And Dance (Soundtrack)
(Clip from 1936-03-01 King Edward VIII – The first broadcast to the Empire as King)
0:43:27 Barney Bigard And His Jazzopaters – Caravan
(Clip from 1936-03-07 PTT Albert Sarrault Proteste Contre Loccupation De La Rhenanie)
0:44:27 Josephine Baker – Mayari
0:46:20 Sukru Tunar – Suzinak Taksim
0:47:05 Sukru Tunar – Karslama
(Clip from 1936-03-xx Winston Churchill – The Loaded Pause)
0:49:09 Ramadan Lolov – Orientalski Kyuchek
(Clip from 1936-03-19 NBC ATMOTA – The Supreme Court and the Constitution)
0:50:49 Milton Brown – Somebody’s Been Using That Thing
(Clip from Pathe Review of 1936)

April – Will the Machine Dominate Man?

0:52:37 Phil Green – Nobody’s Sweetheart (Ballyhooligans)
(Clip from 1936-04-02 NBC ATMOTA – Will Unionization Promote Industrial Recovery)
0:54:31 Kōichi Sugii – Kiso Takashi
0:57:15 Walter De La Mare – Nod
0:58:15 Roy Acuff and his Crazy Tennesseeans – Great Speckled Bird
(Clip from 1936-04-16 NBC ATMOTA – Will the Machine Dominate Man)
1:00:14 Lonnie Glosson – Arkansas Hard Luck Blues
(Clip from 1936-04-16 NBC ATMOTA – Will the Machine Dominate Man)
1:03:11 Harlem Hamfats – Weed Smoker’s Dream
(Clip from 1936-04-17 PTT Maurice Thorez)
1:06:31 Edith Piaf – Je Suis Mordue
(Clip from John Wayne in The Lawless Nineties)
1:08:10 Sri Ma Keow & Chai Wat – Courting The Woman From Chiang Mai

May – Play Faster!

(Gennett Sound Effects – Rainfall and Thunder)
(Clip from 1936-05-01 Adolf Hitler Speech at Krupp Factory in Germany)
1:09:18 NBC Symphony Orchestra – Beethoven’s Symphony No.7 In A Major Op. 92. Ii. Allegretto
(Clip from 1936-05-09 EIAR Benito Mussolini – Vincere)
(Clip from 1936-05-09 EIAR Reports End Of Ethiopian War)
1:10:03 Pablo Casals – Excerpt from Suite No. 2 In D Minor
(Clip of Spencer Tracy in Fury)
1:10:59 Anestis Delias – Sura Ke Mastura
(Clip of Shirley Temple in Poor Little Rich Girl)
1:13:00 Septeto Anacaona – Despúes Que Sufras
(Clip from Dodsworth)
1:16:02 Meade ‘Lux’ Lewis – Celeste Blues
(Clip from Camile)
1:18:03 Mary Lou Williams – Corny Rhythm
(Clip from Reefer Madness)
1:21:15 Albert Ammons – Nagasaki
(Clip from The Story of Louis Pasteur)
1:23:05 Little Brother Montgomery – Farish Street Jive
1:24:23 W. H. Auden – May

June – Red Hot

1:25:17 Teddy Wilson And His Orchestra – Pennies From Heaven
(Clip from After The Thin Man)
1:28:35 Georgia White – Get ’em From The Peanut Man (Hot Nuts)
(Clip from 1936-06-12 Alfred M Landon Speech)
1:30:25 Fats Waller & His Rhythm – It’s A Sin To Tell A Lie
(Clip from 1936-06-26 CBS Democratic Convention)
1:34:54 Louis Armstrong – Mahogany Hall Stomp
(Clip from 1936-06-26 CBS Democratic Convention)
1:13:16 Bo Carter – Cigarette Blues
1:39:34 Robert Johnson – They’re Red Hot
(Clip from Rembrandt)
1:41:07 Lil Johnson – Sam The Hot Dog Man
(Clip from Tarzan Escapes)
1:43:12 Lead Belly – Pig Meat Papa
(Clip from The Story of Louis Pasteur)

July – Now You’re Singing With A Swing

1:44:34 Jesse James – Southern Casey Jones
(Clip from Green Pastures)
1:46:41 Hall Negro Quartet – I’ve Heard Of A City Called Heaven
1:47:30 Elder Otis Jones – O Lord I’m Your Child
1:49:30 Mahmut Celalettin And Udi Marko – Yuzu Pembe
(Clip from AT&T Archives Introduction to the Dial Telephone)
1:50:44 Cuarteto Marcano – Sucedio Lo Que Tenia Que Suceder
(Clip from Disorder in the Court)
1:52:39 Billie Holiday – Summertime
(Clip from 1936-06-30 Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia – Addresses League of Nations)
(Clip from Ten Year Old Boy Pilot)
1:55:50 Benny Goodman – Bugle Call Rag
(Clip from Mr Deeds Goes to Town)
1:58:48 Louis Prima And His New Orleans Gang – Sing, Sing, Sing
2:00:40 RCA – First Television Broadcast July 7, 1936

August – Quite Beyond the Reach of Young Women

2:04:28 Benny Goodman Trio – Tiger Rag
(Clip from 1936-07-28 DRF Jessie Owens Interview)
2:06:54 Johnny Rodríguez Y Su Orchestra – Mulatica
(Clip from 1936-07-31 RRG Radio – Olympic Fire Handed Over At The Czech-German Border)
2:10:01 Karlo – Vladaisko Horo
(Clip from 1936-08-16 Olympic Sports In Berlin)
2:11:59 Stuff Smith Onyx Club Boys – I Hope Gabriel Likes My Music
(Clip from 1936-08-16 Olympic Sports In Berlin)
(Clip fom 1936-xx-xx RRG Edgar Stahff – The Olympic Games And Foreign Germans)
2:14:50 Andy Kirk & his Twelve Clouds – Lotta Sax Appeal
(Clip from Sabotage)
2:18:08 King Radio – Texilia
(Clip from The World’s Tallest Man Robert Wadlow)
2:19:39 George Formby – When I’m Cleaning Windows
2:21:18 George Formby – Quickfire Medley
(Clip from Winterset)

September – My Hours Are Slumberless

2:21:42 Teddy Wilson – Blues In C Sharp
(Clip from 1936-08-30 Franklin D. Roosevelt – I Hate War Speech)
2:25:03 Hal Kemp – Gloomy Sunday
(Clip from 1936-xx-xx Leon Trotsky – On Stalins Moscow Trials)
2:27:36 Busch Quartet – String Quartet No. 12 In E Flat Op. 127
(Clip from 1936-xx-xx PCPT Josef Stalin – On Germany)
(Clip from 1936-xx-xx PCPT Josef Stalin – Will Do His Duty)
(Clip from 1936-xx-xx PCPT Josef Stalin – Workers Paradise)
2:28:42 Walter De La Mare – Song Of Shadows
2:29:15 Barney Bigard (Duke Ellington) – Clouds In My Heart
(Clip from Pathe Review of 1936)
2:31:16 Stellio Et Son Orchestre Creole – Encore Cinq Minutes Veux-Tu!
(Clip from 1936-xx-xx BBC Chamberlain On Tax Hikes For Armaments)
2:32:47 Ink Spots – Christopher Columbus
2:34:28 Emmett Miller & His Georgia Crackers – The Gypsy

October – Vote For Mr Rhythm

(Clip from 1936-10-01 FDR Speech DNC Pittsburgh)
2:38:02 Chick Webb And His Orchestra – Vote For Mr. Rhythm
(Clip from 1936-10-02 WCFL City Series Game 2 Chicago Cubs vs Chicago White Sox)
2:40:41 Riki Miyagawa – Yume Miru Kokoro
(Clip from 1936-10-03 NBC World Series Game 3 NY Giants vs NY Yankees)
2:42:46 The Spirits Of Rhythm – My Old Man
2:44:28 Putney Dandridge – Skeleton In The Closet
(Clip from Hra Bublinek)
2:45:48 Márkos Vamvakáris – Mávra Mátia Mávra Frýdia
(Clip from Mon Père avait raison)
2:47:04 Charles Trenet – Vous Oubliez Votre Cheval
(Clip from 1936-10-28 FDR Fiftieth Anniversary Of Statue Of Liberty)
2:48:46 Georges Boulanger – La Trioletta7
(Clip from Disorder in the Court)
2:50:20 Lew Childre – It Don’t Do Nothing But Rain
(Clip from 1936-10-31 Franklin D. Roosevelt – I Welcome Their Hatred)

November – Isn’t Jazz Just A Lot Of Noise?

2:52:23 J.E. Mainer’s Mountaineers – John Henry Was A Little Boy
(Clip from 1936-10-31 Houdinis Final Seance)
2:54:09 Henry Hall BBC Dance Orchestra – Rusty And Dusty
(Clip from 1936-11-02 The First BBC Programme)
2:56:03 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Basin Street Blues
(Clip from NBC ATMOTA)
(Clip from 1936-11-16 Winston Churchill – The Causes of War)
3:00:10 Hackberry Ramblers – J’ai Pas Bien Fey
(Clip from 1936-11-30 British Pathe – Crystal Palace Fire Aka Great Fire Destroys Crystal Palace)
3:01:46 Marian Anderson – Heav’n, Heav’n
(Clip from 1936-11-26 NBC ATMOTA – What Does the Public Want in Music)
3:02:43 Django Reinhardt Et Le Quintette Du Hot Club De France, Avec Stéphane Grappelli – I Can’t Give You Anything But Love
(Clip from 1936-11-26 NBC ATMOTA – What Does the Public Want in Music)
3:06:18 Duke Ellington – In A Sentimental Mood
(Clip from 1936-11-26 NBC ATMOTA – What Does the Public Want in Music)
3:07:56 Mahmut Celalettin – Neva Ussak Gazel
(Clip from 1936-11-26 NBC ATMOTA – What Does the Public Want in Music)

December – No Regrets

3:09:45 Orchestre Del’s Jazz Biguine – Nain Cochon
(Clip from 1936-11-26 NBC ATMOTA – What Does the Public Want in Music)
3:12:45 Mildred Bailey – Long About Midnight
(Clip from 1936-12-11 King Edward VIII – Abdication Speech)
3:16:30 Blind Boy Fuller – I’m A Rattlesnakin’ Daddy
(Clip from Alastair Cooke on Katherine Hepburn)
3:18:13 Tino Rossi – Le Mur De Ton Jardin
3:21:10 W. H. Auden – A Bride in the 30’s
3:23:06 Busch Quartet – String Quartet No. 12 In E Flat Op. 127
(Clip from 1936-12-29 MBS First Coast To Coast Broadcast)
3:24:42 Futaba Akiko & Columbia Rhythm Boys – Biroudo No Tsuki
(Clip from The Petrified Forest)
3:27:07 Billie Holiday – No Regrets

1936 Preview Part 1

At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. This is a sample of the mix for 1936, and includes the section for January only. To hear the rest of the mix, come to patreon.com/centuriesofsound, where I will be releasing the mix in two parts for $5 and above patrons, or come to centuriesofsound.com, where the entire mix will be streamable from the 14th of June 2021. Thanks to all of my patrons who have so far kept this show going, ad-free, through the first 75 years of sound recording.

MP3 preview download | Patreon | Apple | Spotify | Castbox | Stitcher | RSS

January

0:00:00 NBC Symphony Orchestra – Beethoven’s Symphony No.7 In A Major Op. 92. Ii. Allegretto
(Clips from 1936-01-03 Opening Day of 74th Congress)
0:00:34 Busch Quartet – String Quartet No. 12 In E Flat Op. 127
(Clip from My Man Godfrey)
(Clip from AT&T Archives Introduction to the Dial Telephone)
0:02:21 Gene Krupa – Swing Is Here (+ Benny Goodman)
(Clip from Rose Marie)
0:05:16 Ink Spots – Stompin’ At The Savoy
0:06:17 Benny Goodman & His Orchestra – Stompin’ At The Savoy
(Clip from Reefer Madness)
0:08:28 Memphis Minnie – New Orleans Stop Time
0:11:21 Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys – Steel Guitar Rag
0:14:08 Ciro Rimacs Rumba-Orchester – Maxixe-Carioca

February

(Clip from Disorder in the Court)
0:15:58 Lion – Four Mills Brothers
(Clip from Le Vrai Jeu)
0:18:41 Charles Trenet – Tout Est Au Duc
(Clip from Anthony Adverse)
0:20:56 Django Reinhardt Et Le Quintette Du Hot Club De France, Avec Stéphane Grappelli – Limehouse Blues
0:23:38 W. H. Auden – On This Island
0:24:27 Benjamin Britten, Stuart Legg and John Grierson – Nightmail
0:27:35 The Benny Goodman Quartet – Tiger Rag (Take 1)
(Clip from Cain & Mabel)
0:30:37 Ella Fitzgerald feat. Chick Webb And His Orchestra – Sing Me A Swing Song (And Let Me Dance)
(Clip from Rose Marie)
0:32:24 Jones-Smith Incorporated – Lady Be Good
0:35:29 Slim & Slam – The Flat Foot Floogie

March

0:38:15 Robert Johnson – Cross Road Blues (Take 2)
(Clip from 1936-03-01 King Edward VIII – The first broadcast to the Empire as King)
0:41:18 Fred Astaire – Let’s Face The Music And Dance (Soundtrack)
(Clip from 1936-03-01 King Edward VIII – The first broadcast to the Empire as King)
0:43:27 Barney Bigard And His Jazzopaters – Caravan
(Clip from 1936-03-07 PTT Albert Sarrault Proteste Contre Loccupation De La Rhenanie)
0:44:27 Josephine Baker – Mayari
0:46:20 Sukru Tunar – Suzinak Taksim
0:47:05 Sukru Tunar – Karslama
(Clip from 1936-03-xx Winston Churchill – The Loaded Pause)
0:49:09 Ramadan Lolov – Orientalski Kyuchek
(Clip from 1936-03-19 NBC ATMOTA – The Supreme Court and the Constitution)
0:50:49 Milton Brown – Somebody’s Been Using That Thing
(Clip from Pathe Review of 1936)

April

0:52:37 Phil Green – Nobody’s Sweetheart (Ballyhooligans)
(Clip from 1936-04-02 NBC ATMOTA – Will Unionization Promote Industrial Recovery)
0:54:31 Kōichi Sugii – Kiso Takashi
0:57:15 Walter De La Mare – Nod
0:58:15 Roy Acuff and his Crazy Tennesseeans – Great Speckled Bird
(Clip from 1936-04-16 NBC ATMOTA – Will the Machine Dominate Man)
1:00:14 Lonnie Glosson – Arkansas Hard Luck Blues
(Clip from 1936-04-16 NBC ATMOTA – Will the Machine Dominate Man)
1:03:11 Harlem Hamfats – Weed Smoker’s Dream
(Clip from 1936-04-17 PTT Maurice Thorez)
1:06:31 Edith Piaf – Je Suis Mordue
(Clip from John Wayne in The Lawless Nineties)
1:08:10 Sri Ma Keow & Chai Wat – Courting The Woman From Chiang Mai

May

(Gennett Sound Effects – Rainfall and Thunder)
(Clip from 1936-05-01 Adolf Hitler Speech at Krupp Factory in Germany)
1:09:18 NBC Symphony Orchestra – Beethoven’s Symphony No.7 In A Major Op. 92. Ii. Allegretto
(Clip from 1936-05-09 EIAR Benito Mussolini – Vincere)
(Clip from 1936-05-09 EIAR Reports End Of Ethiopian War)
1:10:03 Pablo Casals – Excerpt from Suite No. 2 In D Minor
(Clip of Spencer Tracy in Fury)
1:10:59 Anestis Delias – Sura Ke Mastura
(Clip of Shirley Temple in Poor Little Rich Girl)
1:13:00 Septeto Anacaona – Despúes Que Sufras
(Clip from Dodsworth)
1:16:02 Meade ‘Lux’ Lewis – Celeste Blues
(Clip from Camile)
1:18:03 Mary Lou Williams – Corny Rhythm
(Clip from Reefer Madness)
1:21:15 Albert Ammons – Nagasaki
(Clip from The Story of Louis Pasteur)
1:23:05 Little Brother Montgomery – Farish Street Jive
1:24:23 W. H. Auden – May

June

1:25:17 Teddy Wilson And His Orchestra – Pennies From Heaven
(Clip from After The Thin Man)
1:28:35 Georgia White – Get ’em From The Peanut Man (Hot Nuts)
(Clip from 1936-06-12 Alfred M Landon Speech)
1:30:25 Fats Waller & His Rhythm – It’s A Sin To Tell A Lie
(Clip from 1936-06-26 CBS Democratic Convention)
1:34:54 Louis Armstrong – Mahogany Hall Stomp
(Clip from 1936-06-26 CBS Democratic Convention)
1:13:16 Bo Carter – Cigarette Blues
1:39:34 Robert Johnson – They’re Red Hot
(Clip from Rembrandt)
1:41:07 Lil Johnson – Sam The Hot Dog Man
(Clip from Tarzan Escapes)
1:43:12 Lead Belly – Pig Meat Papa
(Clip from The Story of Louis Pasteur)