Centuries of Sound on Cambridge 105 Radio – Episode 1 (1853-1885)

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Centuries of Sound’s radio show on Cambridge 105 is now available for listening at your convenience. Rather than simply present a mix of sounds from the year, here I discuss their recording and the world they were made in with my co-host Sean. This is our first ever show (sort of) so thanks for your patience.

Centuries of Sound on Cambridge 105 Radio

Cambridge 105

We’re very pleased to announce that the inaugural Centuries of Sound radio show will go out on Cambridge 105 Radio this evening (Saturday 15th September) at 8pm BST. In contrast to the usual mixes, which feature original sounds only, it will include discussion of the recordings and the era from James and Sean.

You can listen on 101FM, on digital radio, or online here – https://cambridge105.co.uk/listen/ – right now the show isn’t due to be uploaded to Mixcloud, but may be later (in which case I’ll update this blog post.)

The show will continue on the third Saturday of each month.

Centuries of Sound on Resonance FM

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Centuries of Sound’s debut radio show on London’s Resonance FM was this Thursday night, repeated this Friday morning. The show goes through the first four mixes, spanning the years 1860 to 1889, and features my actual real-life voice, which I’m not quite ready to actually listen to myself . The whole hour is here on Mixcloud for you to hear – and for track listings please refer to the actual mixes in the sidebar.

 

How To Be A Victorian

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For the final segment of general Victorian-era background, here’s Ruth Goodman’s book, which is substantially more interesting and informative than the macro-histories of the empire. Of course, most of what we’re coming to was recorded on the other side of the Atlantic, so perhaps I could’ve found something a little more relevant – but plenty of time for that later.

How To Be A Victorian

The Victorian Pharmacist

The follow-up to Victorian Farm seemed to be quite an obscure choice at first, but pharmacies turn out to offer more of a window onto Victorian life and society than even farms do, so there you go. Also, keeping Ruth Goodman on is a winning strategy.

The Victorian Pharmacy [DVD]

America in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

A long-ish lecture series, quite good on overall political themes, but a bit lacking in a certain something – obviously I was most interested in popular culture, especially music, and it wasn’t really his area. As we will continue to see, finding worldwide perspectives seems to be difficult.

The Great Courses – America in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era