Centuries of Sound on Cambridge 105 Radio – Episode 15 (1907)

dancing pig

Time: 8pm BST, Saturday 12th October 2019

Place: Cambridge 105fm

Audio historian DJ James Errington takes you on another time travel adventure, this time to hear some original sounds from 1907, including some wonderful stuff from Enrico Caruso, a few original vaudeville routines and some very premature Christmas cheer.

Listen to the show on 105fm in Cambridge, on DAB digital nationwide, on the Cambridge 105 website here, or on any good radio apps – or, as it’s too late to do any of these things, just stream it below.

Centuries of Sound on Cambridge 105 Radio – Episode 14 (1906)

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Time: 8pm BST, Saturday 14th September 2019

Place: Cambridge 105fm

Another journey back in time with James Errington bringing you original historic recordings, this time from 1906, the year of the San Francisco earthquake. We have a brace of songs from the brilliant Bert Williams, plenty of music hall and vaudeville, and a performance of Scott Joplin’s Maple Leaf Rag from Sousa’s Band.

Listen to the show on 105fm in Cambridge, on DAB digital nationwide, on the Cambridge 105 website here, or on any good radio apps – or, as it is now too late to do any of these things, listen using the facility below.

Some new places to hear Centuries of Sound

listentocos

In the interests of continual growth, travel to new places, diversification, etc. Centuries of Sound is now available on some new platforms.

Spotify
Castbox
Stitcher
Radiopublic

And you can still listen here

Apple Podcasts
RSS Feed (Feedburner)
Mixcloud
Email subscription

Breaker
Bullhorn
Castbox
Google Podcasts
Listen Notes
Luminary
Player FM
Pocket Casts Web
Podchaser
Podknife
Podnews

 

The CoS Tapes #2 – Professors of the Xylophone 1897-1916

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The CoS Tapes are a series of CD-sized compilations available to Centuries of Sounds Members. A donation $5 per month will give you access to these compilations and other member benefits. Join here.

Another compilation of early recorded music – this one has a selection of virtuoso xylophone solos, from the time when this was a standard thing to release.

Tracks

01 Charles P. Lowe – Leonora Waltz (1897)
02 Charles P. Lowe – High And Low (1898)
03 Charles P. Lowe – Brilliant Gallop (1900)
04 Charles P. Lowe. – Carnival Of Venice (1902)
05 J. Frank Hopkins. – Medley Of Reels (1902)
06 Charles P. Lowe – American Patrol (1905)
07 Albert Benzler – Spoontime (1906)
08 Albert Muller with Orchestra – Katie (1906)
09 Charles P. Lowe with Columbia Symphony Orchestra – Medley Of Popular Airs (1906)
10 Chris Chapman – Dill Pickles Rag (1908)
11 Charles Daab – Irish and Scotch Melodies (1910)
12 William H Reitz – Buffalo News March (1913)
13 Charles Daab – Fairest Rose (1914)
14 Lou Chiha Frisco – Kangaroo Hop (1916)

Centuries of Sound on Cambridge 105 Radio – Episode 13 (1905)

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Time: 8pm BST, Saturday 17th August 2019

Place: Cambridge 105fm

Another sonic adventure through time with James Errington, this time joined by guests Dominic, Joanne & Adam to listen to the sounds of 1905 and discuss such pressing topics as skeleton xylophones, the hubris of Dick Dastardly, melancholy in Spanish music, the latter-day lack of songs about bears in pop music and, for some reason, collared doves, which are definitely a type of pigeon.

Listen to the show on 105fm in Cambridge, on DAB digital nationwide, on the Cambridge 105 website here, or on any good radio apps – or, as you have already missed this one, use the handy ‘listen again’ function below! (Please note that the first two minutes are silent – this is the gap for the news which I generally cut off for the upload. Not this time though, apparently!)

Gallipoli

Charles Dixon - Landing at Gallipoli

If you’re looking for stupid, pointless wastes of human life in the First World War, you really are spoilt for choice, but, even among such inauspicious company, the Gallipoli campaign manages to stand out as particularly stupid and particularly pointless.

To sum up: The Ottoman Empire sort-of-accidentally entered the war on the side of the Germans, the allies were at a complete stalemate and Winston Churchill suggested trying something a bit different. In theory this meant smashing through a passage to Russian Black Sea ports to the Mediterranean, in practice it meant sending shiploads of conscripts to disembark on exposed beaches and get shelled by Turkish soldiers.

One memorable account has a party of British officers arranging a conference with local Ottoman officers, whose first question is “Why are you here and why are you letting us shoot your men?”

Here is an episode of Stuff You Missed In History Class on Gallipoli

Here is an episode of BBC Voices of The First World War with original accounts of Gallipoliand here is part two.

Needless to say, anything on this subject is unlikely to relent in its grimness.